Who's My Councilperson?

Providence RI

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Welcome to the Providence City Council website.

Here you will find information about the activities and initiatives of the legislative branch of Providence’s government. From Council meetings to neighborhood meetings, the members of the City Council are committed to taking action to improve the quality of life for every Providence resident.

Providence has vast cultural, artistic, and historical assets, which the Council seeks to enhance as we move forward, conducting the business of the people with integrity, transparency, and efficiency.

We encourage you to get involved in your community, and to make your voices heard by your elected officials on the Council. We are here to serve.

Sincerely,
Providence City Council



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Ward Six Councilman, Michael Correia, announces that Cracksealing will begin Sunday night, October 21, 2018 on Chalkstone Avenue and ending at River Avenue.  Please expect delays.

“I meet with constituents every day, and the one thing that I hear over and over is about the state of our roads in Providence,” stated Councilman Michael Correia.  “I’m very happy to have earmarked some of my Neighborhood Infrastructure Funds to care for Ward Six roadways.”

 

 

Proposes new restrictions for sex offender residency

 

Councilman Luis A. Aponte introduced an amendment to the Providence Code of Ordinances at tonight’s City Council meeting to codify restrictions for registered sex offenders residing in the City of Providence.   

The amendment calls for stronger restrictions for sex offenders who reside in the City of Providence.  It increases the distance sex offenders may reside from schools, daycares, and recreational areas from a 300-foot radius to a 500-foot radius. It also redefines the term “daycare” from a school with a certified pre-K program, to include all licensed daycare facilities that are clearly marked with at least one sign.  Registered sex offenders will also be prohibited from entering or loitering within a 500-foot radius of the premises of a school, daycare center, or recreational area. 

“The City of Providence has no ordinance regarding restrictions for sex offenders,” stated Councilman Luis A. Aponte. “We have depended on state and federal statutes to serve our needs, but what we have learned from Richard Gardner moving into the Washington Park neighborhood is that sometimes those statutes aren’t enough to keep our families safe.  Last night at our community meeting, hundreds of neighbors expressed concerns, fear, and outrage that Mr. Gardner has only to register with the police in the jurisdiction where he lives and must stay 300 feet away from schools. For a man that has committed such heinous crimes these restrictions are not satisfactory. Until our state representatives and senators can craft strong legislation, we need to act now.”

The ordinance that was brought to the floor at tonight’s meeting will be sent to the Committee on Ordinances to be vetted and reviewed.  Councilman Aponte hopes that this will happen at the committee’s earliest convenience.

 

 

 

City Council to review tax stabilization agreements for developments that will bring more than $20M in investment to Wanskuck

Last night, the Providence City Council’s Committee on Finance approved two Tax Stabilization Agreements (TSAs) that would transform the Fourth Ward, clearing the way for the full Council to review the agreements, which would bring a combined $20 million in private investment to the City’s Wanskuck neighborhood. The properties, located at 745 Branch Avenue (Wanskuck Mill) and 145 Corliss Street, will create 300 temporary construction jobs and an additional 125 permanent jobs once the buildings are completed.

Councilman Nicholas J. Narducci has previously testified at public hearings held regarding these TSAs and has been a staunch advocate for their passage, stating that they would greatly improve the neighborhood he has served for the past 12 years.

“The North End has been a community on the rise and these developments are proof of that,” stated City Council Senior Deputy Majority Leader Nicholas J. Narducci Jr. “These two projects will bring much-needed new affordable housing stock to our city, as well as new opportunities for business development to the Ward, and I couldn’t be more thrilled. I have met with the developers and their vision for the neighborhood is one I fully endorse.”

“For many years, I have been urging for more investment in the Wanskuck neighborhood, which has long been underutilized,” said Council President David A. Salvatore, whose ward includes parts of Wanskuck. “This is a neighborhood that will benefit greatly from revitalization efforts, and our entire city will benefit for the hundreds of jobs created by these developments.”

Wanskuck Mill is located at 725, 726, 715, and 745 Branch Avenue and is owned by Branch Holdings, LLC, and currently has 60 apartment units. The project would include an additional 150 reasonably priced apartments ranging from $1,100 to $1,400 per month in rent. The project would also include the addition of commercial space in the property that would potentially include restaurant, retail and/or office space.

Providence 2017, LLC plans to transform an empty lot at 145 Corliss Street into a self-storage facility which would include 863 storage units.

The full Council will review these TSAs and vote on them for a first time at the November 1, 2018 City Council meeting.

 

It is ironic that individuals who sat idly by while colleagues used their City Council and campaign accounts as personal piggy banks suddenly feel the need to spring into action. There are members of the City Council who support a culture of corruption, and they owe the residents of Providence an explanation and an apology. 

I should not have raised my voice to Councilwoman Castillo. However, I will not apologize for feeling passionately that women and minorities should have a much greater stake in our city's business dealings. I am disgusted that my colleagues would rather take cheap shots at me instead of taking action on important issues 

Last night, I told Councilwomen Matos, Ryan and Castillo that they were playing politics, and they should be ashamed. I stand by that. We all, as elected officials, should be embarrassed that in a majority-minority city, where women make up approximately half the population, participation by minority- and women-owned businesses in city dealings is a paltry two percent.

I think we can see this for what it really is: a thinly veiled political attack and power grab. The false outrage generated by some political opponents is insincere and overwrought. The same councilors criticizing me for my tone also stood by and supported those under criminal indictment. The political motivation behind their exaggerated outrage is transparent. I will continue to advocate for this critical issue. 

Councilwoman Matos owes the residents of Providence an apology for her failure to take any action when she saw corruption happening in the City Council, and for continuing to support the people she knows are corrupt. Where were her calls for apologies when her cronies, Councilmen Aponte and Jackson, were under criminal indictment? When one of them pleaded guilty and is now facing jail time, or when they racked up tens of thousands of dollars in campaign fines? Where was her leadership when it mattered?

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David A. Salvatore, City Council President - Councilman, Ward 14